• ANTON, Peter
  • ARMAN
  • ATASH, Metis
  • BALKENHOL, Stephan
  • BARKLEY, John
  • BEAUMONT, Hanneke
  • BIERK, David
  • BLANDINO, Carmelo
  • BOCHNER, Mel
  • BRAINWASH, Mr.
  • BURDENY, David
  • CASSON, Simon
  • CHADWICK, Lynn
  • CHAKI, Yehouda
  • CHERBUIN, Daniel
  • CHIHULY, Dale
  • CICANSKY, Victor
  • CLOSE, Chuck
  • COLE, Darlene
  • COTTON, Will
  • CRAIG-MARTIN, Michael
  • DAVENPORT, Ian
  • DE GRAAF, Jason
  • DEFRANCESCA, Franco
  • DEFRANCESCA, Sophie
  • DINE, Jim
  • DOWNEY, Shaun
  • DREBIN, David
  • DUBUFFET, Jean
  • ELLIOTT, Joan
  • FENNIAK, Paul
  • FERTIG, David
  • FISCHL, Eric
  • FOX, Stephen
  • FURUNES, Anne-Karin
  • GARFIN, Judy
  • GAUCI, Gerard
  • GLASS, T.M.
  • GROSSMAN, Max-Steven
  • HARRINGTON, Michael
  • HENRY, Sean
  • HICKS, Nicola
  • HIRST, Damien
  • HOCKNEY, David
  • HODGKIN, Howard
  • HOFER, Candida
  • HOFFER, Peter
  • HOPKINS, Tom
  • HORNYAK, Jennifer
  • HUGHES, Patrick
  • INDIANA, Robert
  • JEAN, Fabian
  • JENSEN-NAGLE, Joshua
  • KAHN, Wolf
  • KATZ, Alex
  • KOONS, Jeff
  • KRAUSZ, Peter
  • LAHEY, James
  • LALIBERTE, Norman
  • LEFEBVRE, Pierre
  • LEMAY, Ysabel
  • MARANDA, Nathalie
  • MARCHESSAULT, Robert
  • MARCK
  • MARTIN, Jason
  • MASINO, Alexandre
  • MCINTOSH, Brent
  • MOLINARI, Guido
  • MONET, André
  • MUNIZ, Vik
  • MYERS, Marcia
  • NARA, Yoshitomo
  • NORMANDIN, Adam
  • OPIE, Julian
  • OZERI, Yigal
  • PAYETTE, Jacques
  • PHOTOREALISM
  • POLIDORI, Robert
  • PRATT, Barbara
  • PROVOST, Jean-Francois
  • PUJOL, Joan
  • RAMOS, Mel
  • REAFSNYDER, Michael
  • RICHARD, Alvin
  • ROUSSO, Paul
  • RUBINSTEIN, Patrick
  • RUEL, Nicolas
  • RYDER, Sophie
  • SCHERMAN, Tony
  • SCHMITZ-SCHMELZER, Harald
  • SELIGER, Jonathan
  • SEMPLE, Glen
  • SILVERS, Robert
  • SLONEM, Hunt
  • SONMOR, Kevin
  • SPARROW, Lucy
  • SPECTOR, Heidi
  • SULTAN, Donald
  • URZICA, Paula
  • VALKO, Andrew
  • VAN HOVE, Francine
  • VEASEY, Nick
  • VEILHAN, Xavier
  • VITALI, Massimo
  • WALKER, Jason
  • WATEROUS, Jane
  • WEBSTER, John
  • WESSELMANN, Tom
  • YOUNG, Gordon
  • YOUNG, Russell
  • ZHANG, He
  • HORNYAK, Jennifer

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    bouquets, in vases or pots. Flowers as they are, unfolded, flaring. Flowers as enigmatic as their petals. Flowers as strange and distant as their imaginary origins, born from the artist’s brush.

    Jennifer Hornyak paints flowers that don’t exist. Her paintings are therefore not, strictly speaking, based in nature; the flowers that often sit at the centre of her canvases are not given as objects or subjects – still lifes – but as pictorial pretexts or, better yet, as pictorial proposals.

    The flowers Jennifer Hornyak paints serve as catalysts or starting points (both for artist and viewer), as the first words of a pictorial expression or, if one prefers, as the source of a vocabulary they have the virtue to sustain and enrich constantly.

    The artist is well aware of the confusion that may arise when encountering a canvas with flowers painted on it. Who paints flowers nowadays? “It’s a risk I take,” she says. Indeed, they risk a surface reading: some may only see the flowers in her paintings and in doing so overlook the original, complex artworks that they are. Her compositions are at risk of being reduced to mere floral arrangements whose value and function are purely decorative.

    What would artistic creation be if it didn’t involve risk? One must go beyond face value and truly see that Jennifer Hornyak’s paintings are the result of a daily struggle between the artist and her mediums and surfaces (panels or canvases), a bout which materializes space and time: “a struggle,” she says, “as brutal and enchanting as that of a torero in the arena.”

    Jennifer Hornyak’s artworks can be characterized as lyrical gestural abstraction, although one can distinguish forms and figures within them: flowers, beaches, sections of walls. Take for instance Cobalt Blue Tree, where against a granular green water background, one can easily identify a tree with its trunk and its foliage, flurried with oblique blots of electric blue. This stripped, not quite abstracted landscape also holds intense symbolic power, extolling the heroism of solitude and of standing strong in a hostile environment.

    One could say Jennifer Hornyak’s works hold fascinating stories, with each one seeming to call for a sequel. Their apparent lightness conceals a strict discipline. The frivolity of her flowers, whose petals should be considered as colourful tachiste punctuation marks, is challenged by the sinewy black lines that lash at the floral arrangements and by the shadowy spaces that permeate her paintings.

    – Bernard Levy

    Available work :